ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year : 2014  |  Volume : 7  |  Issue : 3  |  Page : 376-380

Efficacy and safety of ankle block versus sciatic-saphenous nerve block for hallux valgus surgery


1 Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care, and Pain Management, Faculty of Medicine, Cairo, Egypt
2 Department of Orthopedics, Ain-Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Ayman I Tharwat
Department of Anesthesiology, Intensive Care, and Pain Management, Faculty of Medicine, Ain-Shams University, Cairo
Egypt
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Source of Support: None, Conflict of Interest: None


DOI: 10.4103/1687-7934.139571

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Background Various nerve block techniques had been used in foot surgery. Objectives The aim of this study was to compare the efficacy of ankle block versus sciatic-saphenous nerve bock for elective hallux valgus surgery. Materials and methods A total of 42 patients who underwent elective hallux valgus surgery under regional anaesthesia were randomized to undergo either ankle block (group I) or combined sciatic-saphenous nerve block (group II). Both blocks were performed using 0.5% bupivacaine mixed with 2% lignocaine. Results Hemodynamic analysis had shown statistically nonsignificant difference between groups I and II. With regard to the duration of postoperative analgesia, there was a statistically nonsignificant difference in the time elapsed before the first analgesic dose between group I (105 min) and group II (88.7 min). However, there was a statistically significant difference in total fentanyl consumption and the need for pethidine injection between group I and group II (P < 0.005). Regarding the visual analogue score, there was a statistically significant difference in the visual analogue score between group I (5.5 ± 4.5) and group II (3.5 ± 3.2) in the 12-h postoperative period (P < 0.005). Conclusion Combined sciatic-distal saphenous nerve block is as efficient as ankle block with anaesthesia, with no difference in hemodynamics. However, sciatic-saphenous block provides longer postoperative analgesia than ankle block alone and allows the use of thigh tourniquet, thus reducing bleeding and operative time.


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