Ain-Shams Journal of Anaesthesiology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2015  |  Volume : 8  |  Issue : 4  |  Page : 670--677

Anesthetic and analgesic efficacy, hemodynamic changes, and sedation following addition of dexmedetomidine to lignocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia for minor hand surgery


Nirvana Ahmed El-Shalakany, Asmaa Mohamed Salah 
 Head and Literature of Anesthesia, Faculty of Medicine, October Six University, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Nirvana Ahmed El-Shalakany
Head and Literature of Anesthesia, Faculty of Medicine, October Six University, Compound Bayity Building A1 Villa 4, 6 October City, Giza
Egypt

Background and aims Adding dexmedetomidine to local anesthetics in intravenous regional anesthesia has been found to produce effective anesthesia and analgesia for minor hand surgery. The aim of this study was to compare hemodynamic changes, adverse effects, patient satisfaction, and anesthetic, analgesic, and sedation qualities in patients who received lidocaine only versus those who received dexmedetomidine with lidocaine during minor hand surgery. Methods One hundred patients scheduled for minor hand surgery were randomly allocated into two equal groups: group L and group DL. Patients in group L received 3 mg/kg lidocaine 0.5% (maximum dose 200 mg), and patients in group DL received 3 mg/kg lidocaine 0.5% (maximum dose 200 mg) + 0.5 mg/kg dexmedetomidine; the total volume was diluted to 40 ml with normal saline 0.9% in both groups and injected at a rate of 20 ml/min. Anesthesia, analgesia, and sedation qualities, hemodynamic changes, patient satisfaction, and adverse effects were recorded. Results The studied groups showed no significant difference in demographic data. In hemodynamics, mean arterial blood pressure and heart rate showed a statistically significant difference during and up to 30 min after tourniquet release (P < 0.001), and oxygen saturation showed no statistically significant difference during and after surgery (P > 0.05). There were statistically significant differences between the two groups (P < 0.05) as regards the quality of anesthesia, time of regression of sensory and motor blocks, and patient satisfaction. There were more patients who reported excellent satisfaction in the DL group (76%) compared with the L group (20%). Intraoperative and postoperative analgesic requirements were greater in the lidocaine group than in the dexmedetomidine group, and postoperative pain score (visual analog scale) was lower in the DL group compared with L group. Sedation score after release of tourniquet was significantly higher in the DL group compared with the L group except in the first 5 min. Conclusion On the basis of the results in this study we concluded that dexmedetomidine is a good adjuvant anesthetic, analgesic, and sedative agent in intravenous regional anesthesia.


How to cite this article:
El-Shalakany NA, Salah AM. Anesthetic and analgesic efficacy, hemodynamic changes, and sedation following addition of dexmedetomidine to lignocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia for minor hand surgery .Ain-Shams J Anaesthesiol 2015;8:670-677


How to cite this URL:
El-Shalakany NA, Salah AM. Anesthetic and analgesic efficacy, hemodynamic changes, and sedation following addition of dexmedetomidine to lignocaine in intravenous regional anesthesia for minor hand surgery . Ain-Shams J Anaesthesiol [serial online] 2015 [cited 2021 Dec 1 ];8:670-677
Available from: http://www.asja.eg.net/article.asp?issn=1687-7934;year=2015;volume=8;issue=4;spage=670;epage=677;aulast=El-Shalakany;type=0