Ain-Shams Journal of Anaesthesiology

ORIGINAL ARTICLE
Year
: 2017  |  Volume : 10  |  Issue : 1  |  Page : 195--200

Effect of preoperative pregabalin versus gabapentin on postoperative pain control after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery


Khalid G Abd El-Maksoud1, Mokhtar M Younes2, Sherif A Elokda3 
1 Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Pain Relief, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt
2 Lecturer of Anesthesia and Intensive Care, Al-Azher University Hospital, Cairo; Department of Anesthesia, Fakhry Hospital, Al-Khobar, Egypt
3 Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Pain Management, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt

Correspondence Address:
Khalid G Abd El-Maksoud
Department of Anesthesia, ICU and Pain Relief, National Cancer Institute, Cairo University, Cairo, Egypt; P.O. Box 73371, Al-Khobar 31952
Egypt

Background Perioperative gabapentin helps produce a significant opioid-sparing effect and probably also improves postoperative pain scores. Pregabalin is a novel drug with a heightened research interest in the analgesic, sedative, anxiolytic, and opioid-sparing effects, in various pain settings, including postoperative pain. We investigated pregabalin analgesic efficacy in morbid obese patients experiencing acute pain after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery and compared it with gabapentin and placebo. Patients and methods A randomized, placebo-controlled study was conducted on 90 morbidly obese patients undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. Patients were allocated into one of the three groups; the pregabalin group in which the patients received 300 mg pregabalin, the gabapentin group in which the patients received 1200 mg gabapentin, or the control group in which the patients received placebo 2 h prior to surgery. Postoperative pain was controlled with intravenous fentanyl via patient controlled analgesia (PCA). Fentanyl consumption over 24 h and pain intensity measured by visual analogue score at rest (static) and during cough (dynamic) at recovery time, 1, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h were recorded. Also sedation status, somnolence, dizziness, headache, nausea, and vomiting were monitored. Results Postoperative 24 h fentanyl consumption was significantly higher in the control group compared with both pregabalin and gabapentin groups (P<0.001). Pain intensity on visual analogue score (static and dynamic) was significantly higher in the control group compared with both pregabalin and gabapentin groups at time of recovery, 1, 2, 6, 12, and 24 h postoperatively. Numeric sedation score was significantly lower in the control group compared with pregabalin and gabapentin groups at time of recovery, 1, 2, and 6 h postoperatively. No significant differences were found among the three groups as regards somnolence, dizziness, headache, nausea, and vomiting. Conclusion A single dose of 300 mg pregabalin or 1200 mg gabapentin given 2 h before surgery is better than placebo for postoperative pain control for laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery without significant side effects.


How to cite this article:
Abd El-Maksoud KG, Younes MM, Elokda SA. Effect of preoperative pregabalin versus gabapentin on postoperative pain control after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery.Ain-Shams J Anaesthesiol 2017;10:195-200


How to cite this URL:
Abd El-Maksoud KG, Younes MM, Elokda SA. Effect of preoperative pregabalin versus gabapentin on postoperative pain control after laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. Ain-Shams J Anaesthesiol [serial online] 2017 [cited 2021 Apr 21 ];10:195-200
Available from: http://www.asja.eg.net/article.asp?issn=1687-7934;year=2017;volume=10;issue=1;spage=195;epage=200;aulast=Abd;type=0